Posts Tagged vehicle-ramming attacks

3 Things to Consider if Caught in a Vehicle-Ramming Attack

Security PostVehicle-Ramming Attacks: Personal Safety and Situational Awareness

Given how distracted drivers can be, I have always stood back from the edge of the curb, knowing a car could accidently drive onto the sidewalk and run me down.

In today’s world, unfortunately, this is done on purpose, in what have become known as ‘vehicle-ramming attacks’ that we see abroad, but now also in the United States and Canada.

So what can we do?

Situational awareness is key, but it is important to remember there is no reason to live in a state of fear over these very low-probability events. You are far better off remaining relaxed, yet observant, as you go about your business, with some knowledge of what to be aware of, and what you would do if such an attack took place.

Remember, for the most part, this form of attack is carried out where there are  lots of people to achieve the most harm, also known as a ‘target rich environment.’ Therefore, if there is a vehicle-ramming  while at a concert or farmers market etc, be ready to move away from the most crowded locations which the perpetrators are drawn to.

Environment: Regardless of where you are, ask yourself: if a vehicle-ramming was in progress or looked imminent, what structure is nearby that I could take cover behind? This could be a pillar, a tree, heavy planter boxes, or even just stepping into a store, lobby, or alcove.

Security and protective design has also been implemented. Many buildings have bollards as seen in the photo above. These sturdy posts are placed strategically, so a vehicle cannot get close to a building. Be aware of these and large concrete blocks and footers placed for the same reason.

Opening distance may also be an option if there is still time.

If you can, it is always best to get as far away as possible from the incident, in case the situation includes an explosive device or an armed driver and accomplice. Alert others, but do not let indecisive people slow you down.

Keep in mind, a larger ramming vehicle can push a car you are hiding in front of or behind over you and therefore is not good cover. Also be aware of seeking cover that could leave you trapped like  a service road between buildings or similar alleys that have dead ends.

 

Special Senses: As you go about your day, keep an ear and eye out. It is counter intuitive to hear or see a vehicle speeding up in an area where all others are slowing down.

Often, larger vehicles are rented for their mass and ability to do damage, and the driver may not be familiar with operating this vehicle. As a result, keep an eye out for a such a vehicle being driven poorly or bumping into parked cars as it progresses. If you hear a series of impact sounds, this may be that vehicle progressing toward your area, as it scrapes past parked cars and other structures.

Having said this, keep in mind, this attack may involve an ordinary car, as we saw in Charlottesville. Don’t always assume a fast-moving car is a police vehicle. Be sure to remain alert.

If you see a vehicle weaving and driving, including up onto the curb, again, seek cover.

If the incident turns out to be an accident or something non-malicious, there is no harm in a false alarm.

Always trust your instincts. If you get a bad “vibe” about your environment, move to another, or open distance. The military trains soldiers to be in tune with the “atmospherics” of their surroundings and to honor intuition. We should too.

Final thought……If you walk facing traffic you can not only see vehicles coming toward you, although in a vehicle attack, the rules of the road are not necessarily followed, but it also makes harder for a car or van to pull up alongside you and try abduct you.

Being Proactive versus Reactive

Having your action plan for this rare “What if?” scenario in your back pocket does not make you paranoid. It leaves you prepared.

Personal safety is key. Preparedness and awareness are two very intuitive, powerful, and protective tools.

Related: “Condition Yellow” The perfect state of situational awareness.

 

 

 

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